SOLAS将对船用起重设备做出具体规定。

海事 / /



After more than eight years work, IMO member states have agreed there is a need for an amendment to the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention covering onboard lifting appliances – cranes, loose gear and winches.

This month’s meeting of the Maritime Safety Committee saw a majority of member states in favor of amending the SOLAS convention to include requirements for lifting equipment, a proposal led by Maritime New Zealand delegates.

A SOLAS regulation will be developed around the design, construction and installation of onboard lifting appliances. In addition, these types of equipment will be maintained in accordance with guidelines that will also be developed to cover design, fabrication and construction; onboard procedures for routine inspection, maintenance and operation of lifting appliances and winches; and familiarization of ship's crew and shore-based personnel.

Maritime New Zealand staff have been striving since 2007 to get this work started after recording 334 incidents at New Zealand ports on foreign-flagged vessels between 2000 and 2007, of which 64 involved ships’ lifting appliances. Eighteen of these incidents involved serious injury.

Concerns about lifting gear on foreign-flagged vessels prompted a focused inspection campaign and the results were presented in 2007 to the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee which instructed New Zealand to submit a request for a new work program item.

In 2011, New Zealand successfully co-sponsored a proposal to add a work program item to the IMO agenda to develop requirements for construction and installation of onboard lifting appliances. Successful lobbying of members states on the issue by Maritime NZ resulted in this month’s outcome.

“Failure of ship cargo handling appliances puts stevedores at risk, as well as the crew of foreign ships handling cargoes in NZ ports. New Zealand imports and exports are also at significant risk of damage due to lifting appliance failure, and this work will help reduce that risk. It is likely to take several years to finalise the changes to SOLAS but we have made a significant step in the right direction,” said Maritime NZ Director Keith Manch.

Since January 2013, seven incidents involving lifting equipment have occurred in New Zealand ports with one resulting in a significant injury to a ship’s crew member.

Offshore Crane Notation Introduced

Separately, classification society RINA has launched new standards for cranes which will be used for transhipment of bulk cargoes at sea and has completely revised and rebased its rules for offshore cranes used in offshore construction, service and demolition.

Under the new rules for lifting appliances, RINA has split the requirements for specific crane types (ship, offshore and transhipping) into free-standing sections to make the rules more user-friendly.

The new RINA rules for transhipment cranes provide for a specific notation, CARGO HANDLING, which takes into account both static and dynamic loads on transhipment cranes used on vessels transhipping bulk cargoes in open waters, and also details how these are related to structural requirements for the vessel and crane and to the operating envelope.

RINA’s revised rules for offshore cranes have been based on European Standard EN 13852, which takes a different and more modern approach to commonly used offshore crane standards. This allows for a more structured approach to offshore crane certification.

Dino Cervetto, Director of Technical Services, RINA Services, says, “There is a gap in the market for standards for transhipment cranes. RINA’s new rules contain an operational chart which will allow operators of floating transhipment terminals to widen the weather window in which they can work. It also takes into account the specific wave height and orientation of the terminal. Cranes certified under this new notation will be able to operate safely for longer and give more operational time to terminal operators without fear of breakdowns or overload conditions.

“RINA believes that there is a need in the offshore industry for a clear standard for floating cranes and cranes built onto OSVs which is based on European requirements.”

The first CARGO HANDLING notation has been assigned to the floating crane transhipment unit FC Asia Bella, built by China’s Chengxi Shipyard for the Indonesian owner Pt. Pelayaran Mitra Kaltim Samudera.


经过超过8年的讨论和努力,SOLAS公约的成员同意有必要对船上起重设备的内容进行修订,包括起重机、可卸部件和绞车。

本月的海上安全委员会会议上,大多数的成员国同意对SOLAS公约进行修改,采纳包括由新西兰代表提出的对起重设备要求的提议。

SOLAS公约的规定将围绕起重设备的设计、建造和安装进行制定。此外,这些设备的类型也应符合指南的规定。指南的制定也将涵盖起重设备和绞车的设计、制造和建造,船上的常规检查、维护和运行程序,以及供船员和岸上工作人员的熟悉过程。

虽然新西兰当前的法律对起重装置的标准作出了规定,如果是有关外籍船只在新西兰港口产生问题可以提起诉讼,对SOLAS公约的修订将从国际范围上提升标准。这样能够防止未具备合格起重设备的船舶抵达新西兰港口,并提升新西兰海事局通过港口国控制机制处理问题的能力。

新西兰海事局的工作人员自2007年起就努力开展这一工作,因为从2000年-2007年在新西兰港口共记录了334起外籍船舶事故,其中64起涉及船舶的起重设备,而这之中的18起涉及严重伤害。

对外籍船舶上的起重设备的担忧促发了一项集中大检查,检查机构已于2007年提交了国际海事组织(IMO)的海上安全委员会。委员会指示新西兰提交一项新的工作项目请求。

2011年,新西兰成功地参与一项提议,在IMO议程中增加一项工作项目,制定船上起重设备的建造和安装要求。通过对成员国就新西兰海事局提出的这一议题进行成功的游说,才得在本月会议取得该成果。

“这应归功于新西兰海事局工作人员的承诺,他们发现这一问题并一直要求重视与坚持,直到对SOLAS公约进行修订的提议获得通过。”新西兰海事局主任Keith Manch说到。

“这一工作要等到对SOLAS公约中关于起重设备的修订获得通过才后算完结,不过这算是一个重要的里程碑。我相信这一工作能够使全球的港口该产业的发展更加安全。

“船舶货物操作设备的故障会给新西兰港口装卸工人,以及外籍船上装卸货物的船员造成危险。起重设备的故障也会给新西兰的进出口带来巨大风险。而这项工作将有助于降低风险。

“对SOLAS公约的修订可能要花费几年的时间才能完成,但我们已经在正确的方向上迈出了重要的一步。”

自2013年1月,在新西兰港口就发生了7起起重机事故,其中一起造成一名船员严重受伤。

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